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  • What is Interpol?
    Interpol, short for the International Criminal Police Organization, facilitates cooperation between law enforcement agencies in different countries to prevent and solve crimes. Interpol does not have its own police force, but instead acts as a network of member countries' law enforcement agencies. It provides a platform for police forces to share information, expertise, and resources to fight crime more effectively. Interpol works on a wide range of criminal activities, including terrorism, organised crime, cybercrime, environmental crime, and drug trafficking, among others. Its databases hold information on wanted criminals, stolen and lost travel documents, stolen vehicles, and other crime-related information. Interpol is governed by its General Assembly, which is made up of representatives from each member country. Its day-to-day operations are managed by the Secretary General, who is appointed by the General Assembly. Interpol currently has 194 member countries.
  • I can’t see myself on Interpol’s website. Am I listed?
    If you suspect that your name may be listed on Interpol, checking the Interpol website is an unreliable way of confirming a listing. The site does not provide a comprehensive or even up-to-date list of names currently subjected to Interpol Notices. There are, however, a number of ways we can help determine your status with Interpol: Each member country of Interpol has an Interpol National Central Bureau NCB that serves as a liaison between the national law enforcement agency and Interpol. On your behalf, we can contact your country's NCB to inquire if your name is listed in Interpol's database. We can conduct an in-depth consultation with you to better determine if you have any legal issues that may leave you vulnerable to an Interpol listing, and can guide you on how to proceed. We can check with the country you believe may have listed you - If you suspect that a particular country has listed you on Interpol, we are able to contact their law enforcement agency or embassy to inquire about your status. Keep in mind that some countries may not provide information about Interpol listings to individuals who are not citizens or residents of that country, it is therefore best to designate an advocate with a trusted network of contacts in the law enforcement community. Our CEO and Founder, Radha Stirling, has spent over 15 years developing such resources, and has a reliable process for confirming locally reported cases to Interpol across multiple countries globally
  • How do I find out if I’m on Interpol?
    If you suspect that you may be listed on Interpol, you should immediately contact Detained in Dubai. We will proceed with several steps to verify your status with Interpol, including; contacting the local law enforcement agency or the Interpol National Central Bureau (NCB) in your country to inquire about your status; we will also inquire with the authorities in the country you suspect may have requested the possible listing; or we will liaise directly with the Interpol General Secretariat in Lyon, France, on your behalf to ascertain your status. You will need to provide your personal information, including your full name, date of birth, and passport number, and explain the reasons for which you are potentially listed on the Interpol database, and we will submit an Interpol check on your behalf.
  • Can Interpol arrest me?
    Interpol does not have the power to arrest individuals. Interpol is an international organisation that acts as a liaison between law enforcement agencies of different countries, and its main purpose is to facilitate the exchange of information between law enforcement agencies. However, if your name is listed on the Interpol database with an international arrest warrant, it means that law enforcement agencies in various countries have been notified of your wanted status. If you are located in a country where the warrant is valid and there is an extradition agreement in place, then you may be arrested and extradited to the country where the warrant was issued. It is important to note that extradition procedures can be complicated and involve a variety of legal issues, so it is important to contact Detained in Dubai immediately if you believe you may be subject to extradition.
  • Will Interpol come and find me?
    If your name is listed on Interpol, it means that there is an international arrest warrant out for you, and Interpol will assist in the cooperation between different law enforcement agencies to locate and arrest you. However, Interpol does not have its own police force, and they cannot arrest people themselves. Instead, they work with national law enforcement agencies to help track down and arrest individuals who are wanted internationally. So if your name is listed on Interpol, it is possible that law enforcement agencies in your country or other countries may be actively looking for you. If you are concerned about your status with Interpol, it is important to contact Detained in Dubai immediately to understand your options and to protect your rights.
  • What happens if I travel?
    If your name is listed on Interpol with an international arrest warrant, there is a high chance that you will be arrested if you travel to another country. This is because Interpol is an international law enforcement organisation that facilitates cooperation between police forces in different countries, and countries may be required to detain individuals who are the subject of Interpol notices. When you arrive in another country, your passport will be checked, and if your name appears in Interpol's database, the authorities in that country may detain you and start extradition proceedings to return you to the country that issued the arrest warrant. It is important to note that the specific procedures and laws surrounding extradition vary between countries and the circumstances of the alleged crime, but generally, it is not advisable to travel to another country if you are the subject of an international arrest warrant. It is recommended that you contact Detained in Dubai before making definitive travel arrangements to allow us to assess any potential risks you may encounter.
  • I didn’t get stopped at immigration. Does that mean I’m clear?
    The fact that you were not stopped by immigration officials upon entry or exit from another country does not necessarily mean that you are not listed on Interpol. There could be a number of reasons why you were not stopped, such as the authorities in that country not having access to Interpol's database, or if you are on Interpol's database, but not currently listed as a wanted person. It could also be that the authorities of that particular country do not prioritise listings requested by certain countries, as several states are known to abusively request Interpol listings without proper cause. It's important to note that Interpol is a global law enforcement organisation that facilitates cooperation between police forces in different countries. They maintain a database of wanted persons, which is accessible to law enforcement agencies in member countries. If you suspect that your name is listed on Interpol, it's important to consult with Detained in Dubai to advise you on how to proceed.
  • I am on Interpol. Why didn’t the police arrest me?
    There could be a number of reasons why you have not been arrested, despite being listed on Interpol. It's important to note that Interpol is not a law enforcement agency and does not have the power to arrest individuals. Instead, Interpol facilitates cooperation and information sharing between law enforcement agencies in different countries. The decision to arrest an individual who is listed on Interpol is typically made by the law enforcement agency in the country where the individual is located. This decision is based on a number of factors, including the severity of the crime, the individual's location, and the willingness and ability of the law enforcement agency to pursue the case. Many countries (particularly in the Middle East) have become notorious for abusive Interpol listings, and local law enforcement may opt not to pursue Interpol requests originating from these states. If you are on Interpol and have not been arrested, it could be that the law enforcement agency in the country where you are located has not yet identified you as a priority or that they do not have sufficient evidence to arrest you. Alternatively, it's possible that they are actively pursuing the case but have not yet been successful in apprehending you. It's important to note that being listed on Interpol can have serious consequences, even if you have not yet been arrested. It's always advisable to consult with us if you believe that you are on Interpol or are concerned about your legal status.
  • Can I do anything to prevent being listed on Interpol?
    If you are not sure whether you have criminal cases abroad, it's important to consult with us as soon as possible to help you determine your legal status and advise you on the appropriate steps to take. It's always better to address any potential legal issues proactively, rather than waiting until you are listed on Interpol or facing criminal charges in a foreign country. Because of our years of experience in the field, we are able to provide clients with an Interpol Prevention service, whereby we will liaise with the Interpol General Secretariat in Lyon, France; notifying them of a potentially abusive Notice request by countries infamous for misusing the Interpol system. If you have concerns about your legal status, it's important to address them as soon as possible and seek our professional advice. Many countries such as the UAE, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and others, routinely pursue police reports without notifying the accused individuals, and even issue convictions in absentia. It is common for people to discover they have been charged and sentenced for an alleged crime and listed on Interpol only once they have been detained on a Red Notice. It's important to note that being listed on Interpol does not necessarily mean that you are accused or convicted of a crime. Interpol lists individuals who are wanted for a variety of reasons, including being a witness in a criminal case or for extradition purposes. If you are listed on Interpol and believe that it is a mistake or that you have been falsely accused, it's important to contact us so that we can take appropriate steps on your behalf to clear your name.
  • I’ve been arrested. What happens next?
    If you have been arrested on the basis of an Interpol listing, the next steps will depend on the specific circumstances of your case. However, in general, the following steps are likely to occur: You will be informed of the reason for your arrest: The law enforcement agency that has arrested you should inform you of the reason for your arrest and the details of the Interpol listing. You may be held in custody: Depending on the severity of the alleged offence and the laws of the country where you were arrested, you may be held in custody for a period of time while the authorities investigate the case and decide on the appropriate course of action. You should be given the opportunity to challenge the Interpol listing: If you believe that the Interpol listing is a mistake or that you have been falsely accused, you will have the opportunity to challenge the listing through the appropriate legal channels. Extradition proceedings may be initiated: If you are wanted in another country for a criminal offence, extradition proceedings may be initiated to transfer you to that country to face trial or serve a sentence. The process of extradition can be complex, and it's important to consult with Detained in Dubai to ensure that your rights are protected throughout the process. The case will proceed through the legal system: If you are charged with a criminal offence, the case will proceed through the legal system in the country where you were arrested. This may involve a trial, plea bargain negotiations, or other legal proceedings.
  • I’m being extradited. Can you help me?
    If you have been arrested on the basis of an Interpol notice and an international arrest warrant, and you are now facing extradition, there may be several legal remedies available to prevent your extradition. These remedies will depend on the specific circumstances of your case and the laws of the country where you are being held. It is vital to contact us immediately so that we can support you throughout this process and explore every option to protect you from extradition, such as: Providing expert witness testimony: We can provide expert testimony (written or in person) regarding human rights concerns, failures of due process, and safety risks presented by extradition to a particular country; such as the UAE, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Iran, or others. Western countries must not extradite individuals to countries where basic protections and legal safeguards are not adequate to ensure the safety of their citizens. Challenging the legality of the Interpol notice and arrest warrant: We may be able to challenge the legality of the Interpol notice and arrest warrant if there are procedural irregularities or if your rights have been violated. This could involve arguing that the evidence against you is insufficient or that the charges against you are politically motivated, or otherwise do not conform with Interpol rules or the norms and standards that govern extradition. Claiming asylum or refugee status: If you believe that you may face persecution or harm if you are extradited, you may be able to claim asylum or refugee status in the country where you are being held. This could provide you with protection from extradition and allow you to remain in the country. We can assist with this process. Invoke human rights protections: Extradition proceedings must generally comply with human rights protections, including the right to a fair trial, the prohibition of torture and inhuman treatment, and the right to respect for private and family life. We may be able to invoke these protections to prevent your extradition, particularly in cases involving extradition to Middle Eastern countries or other documented human rights abusers. Negotiate a plea bargain or settlement: In some cases, it may be possible for us to negotiate a plea bargain or settlement with the authorities in the country where you are being held. Securing the release of individuals charged for alleged financial crimes in the Gulf States through negotiated settlements is a particular area of our expertise. Seek a pardon or clemency: In some cases, it may be possible for us to seek a pardon or clemency from the authorities in the country seeking extradition. This could involve appealing directly to the relevant authorities, seeking support from human rights organisations or diplomatic channels, or through coordinated campaigns for media attention. Again, this is an area in which we excel. It's important to note that the legal remedies available to prevent extradition will vary depending on the specific circumstances of your case, and it's essential to contact us as soon as possible to ensure that your rights are protected throughout the process.
  • Are there any countries that I can safely travel to while on Interpol?
    Being listed on Interpol means that there is an international arrest warrant issued against you, which can be a serious legal issue. It is essential to resolve any legal matters and clear your name before travelling to any country. If you have an Interpol red notice or warrant against you, you should consult with us to determine your options and ensure your safety. There is no guarantee against detention and extradition if you travel while being listed on Interpol though we are able to advise on which countries will offer safer passage where travel is essential. Moreover, every country has its laws and regulations, and Interpol is an international organisation that aims to promote cooperation between police forces worldwide. Therefore, it is best to seek professional advice before you plan to travel.
  • I’m on Interpol. Can you help me remove my name?
    Yes; We have a 100% success record in removing names abusively listed on Interpol. If you are listed on Interpol, it means that a request has been made by a member country for your arrest and extradition. To have your name removed from the Interpol system, we will need to take immediate action to determine whether or not the listing conforms with Interpol’s rules on data collection, or if the listing is abusive. We can take several steps to remove your name from Interpol's list if the listing appears to be valid: We can appoint a local lawyer: You will need a qualified and experienced legal representative who can help you understand the charges and the procedures to clear your name. We can guide you through the legal process in the country where the warrant was issued and provide support throughout the proceedings. Contact the country that issued the warrant: We can reach out to the country's embassy or consulate and challenge the charges against you. They may be able to provide more information about the case and help us determine how best to proceed. Highlight the injustice of the case in the media: To clear your name, we can draw media attention to the case to demonstrate any unfairness, lack of due process, or human rights abuses related to the country requesting the Notice. Through presenting this narrative in a compelling manner to the relevant authorities, we can secure a resolution to the case upon which the Notice was issued. Request a review: We can request a review of your case by Interpol's Commission for the Control of Interpol's Files (CCF). The CCF will examine your case and decide if your name should be removed from the Interpol system. Interpol listings requested by the Gulf States, as well as many others, frequently do not conform with Interpol’s rules on data collection, and we can argue on your behalf for the deletion of your record by identifying the Notice as invalid. It is essential to take legal action promptly and work with our qualified legal professionals to increase your chances of having your name removed from the Interpol system.
  • Will Interpol accept notices for debts?
    Unpaid debts or bounced cheques are generally considered civil matters, and the issuance of an Interpol Red Notice for such cases is invalid. Interpol only publishes Red Notices for individuals wanted for serious crimes that violate international law. Debt-related or check-related issues are usually considered financial or commercial matters, and the issuance of an Interpol Red Notice would not be justified in such cases. However, laws and regulations regarding debt and cheque-related offences vary from country to country. In some jurisdictions, such as in the Gulf States, failure to pay a debt or a bounced cheque may be considered a criminal offence. In such cases, it is possible that an individual could be inappropriately subjected to an Interpol listing. Typically, debt or cheque cases are processed through the courts in the Gulf States as fraud cases. This dishonest characterisation allows them to report such cases to Interpol, and it will require our intervention to ensure that such Interpol listings are challenged and removed.
  • What is the minimum threshold for reports to Interpol?
    Financial crime of less than 15,000 Euros should not be reported to Interpol but they still are. Credit card debts of less than 5,000 have been listed on Interpol’s database by adding fees and charges to the amount. Interpol operates as a platform that facilitates international cooperation between law enforcement agencies around the world. It relies on member countries to submit requests for assistance or information to its databases, and unfortunately, the organisation does not carefully scrutinise the validity of members’ requests before issuing an Interpol Notice. The decision to submit a request to Interpol is based on the individual case and the needs of the investigating agency. Member countries are responsible for assessing the seriousness of the crime and determining whether an Interpol Notice is necessary.
  • My bank is threatening to list me on Interpol. What can I do?
    If a bank in the UAE, for example, is threatening to have your name listed on Interpol over a bounced cheque and unpaid loans, we can take immediate action to resolve the matter and avoid you being listed. We can: Contact the bank: It is essential to communicate with the bank and understand the details of the situation. We can negotiate a payment plan with the bank to clear your debts and avoid any legal action. Assign a local lawyer: We can connect you with a qualified legal professional who is familiar with the laws and regulations in the UAE (or other relevant country). With our case management, we can help you understand your legal rights and obligations and advise you on the best course of action to avoid being listed on Interpol. Negotiate a settlement: We can initiate negotiations with the bank to reach a settlement to pay off the debts in full or in part. A settlement can help avoid any legal action, and it may be possible to negotiate more favourable terms than those initially proposed by the bank. Initiate Interpol prevention: Because debt and bounced cheque cases do not conform with Interpol’s rules, and because countries like the UAE are notorious for abusing the Interpol system with financial cases; we can notify the General Secretariat in Lyon, France that an inappropriate listing may be requested in your case. We urge clients facing debt disputes to keep accurate records of all communications with the bank and any legal representatives. This can be helpful in resolving any disputes and for challenging any Interpol Notice that may be issued. It is important to take immediate action to avoid being listed on Interpol. If you are listed, it can have severe consequences, including travel restrictions, difficulty obtaining visas, and possible arrest and extradition. If you have outstanding debts, loans, or bounced cheques in any foreign jurisdiction, we strongly advise that you contact us as soon as possible to proactively address these matters before they are escalated by the bank or local authorities.
  • The US declined my travel visa because of the Interpol Red Notice. Will I be able to go there again?
    If your travel visa to the United States was declined because of an Interpol Red Notice, it means that the US authorities have information indicating that you are wanted for a serious crime in another country. This can make it difficult for you to obtain a travel visa in the future, as the US authorities may consider you a flight risk. However, it is possible to challenge an Interpol Red Notice and have it removed from the system if you can demonstrate that the allegations against you are unfounded or that due process was not followed in your case. We can assist with your visa application following the Interpol deletion and provide you with an expert letter for authorities. You should consult with us to assist you in this process, as we have extensive experience dealing with US authorities and challenging wrongful Interpol listings. If the Interpol Red Notice is removed, you may have a better chance of obtaining a travel visa to the United States. However, it is ultimately up to the US authorities to decide whether to grant you a visa, and they may take into account a range of factors, including your criminal history, travel history, and the reasons for your visit to the United States. It is essential to take the necessary steps to clear your name and resolve any legal issues that led to the Interpol Red Notice. This may help to increase your chances of being granted a travel visa to the United States or other countries in the future.
  • I am immigrating to Canada and have a Red Notice causing me problems. What can I do?
    If you are immigrating to Canada and have an Interpol Red Notice causing you problems, there are steps you can take to address the issue: Consult with us : We are highly experienced in dealing with immigration issues and can provide you with guidance on how to handle the situation. We can help you understand the legal process and advise you on the best course of action. Appoint us to address the legal issues: If you are the subject of a Red Notice, it means that you are wanted by law enforcement in another country. It is important to address the legal issues underlying the Red Notice, as well as to determine the validity of the Notice itself. We can help you develop a plan to address the legal issues and possibly have the Red Notice removed. Provide information to Canadian immigration authorities: When applying for immigration to Canada, you will be required to disclose any criminal history or legal issues. It is important to be transparent and provide all relevant information to the Canadian immigration authorities. In such proceedings, we can liaise on your behalf and best explain all issues surrounding the Red Notice to assure the authorities that the matter is either invalid, or is being addressed. They will review your application and make a determination based on their assessment of the situation. Seeking a waiver: In some cases, it may be possible for us to seek a waiver or an exemption from Canadian immigration authorities if you have a Red Notice against you. Once you have explained your situation to us, we can advise you on whether this is a viable option in your case. Overall, the key to resolving a Red Notice issue when immigrating to Canada is to be transparent and appoint a qualified advocate to best explain your case and the underlying legal issues and/or the invalidity of the Red Notice against you.
  • I am immigrating to the US and have a Red Notice causing me problems. What can I do?
    If you are immigrating to the US and have an Interpol Red Notice causing you problems, there are steps you can take to address the issue: Consult with us: We are highly experienced in dealing with immigration issues and can provide you with guidance on how to handle the situation. We can help you understand the legal process and advise you on the best course of action. Appoint us to address the legal issues: If you are the subject of a Red Notice, it means that you are wanted by law enforcement in another country. It is important to address the legal issues underlying the Red Notice, as well as to determine the validity of the Notice itself. We can help you develop a plan to address the legal issues and possibly have the Red Notice removed. Provide information to US immigration authorities: When applying for immigration to the US, you will be required to disclose any criminal history or legal issues. It is important to be transparent and provide all relevant information to the US immigration authorities. In such proceedings, We can liaise on your behalf and best explain all issues surrounding the Red Notice to assure the authorities that the matter is either invalid, or is being addressed. They will review your application and make a determination based on their assessment of the situation. Seeking a waiver: In some cases, it may be possible for us to seek a waiver or an exemption from US immigration authorities if you have a Red Notice against you. Once you have explained your situation to us, we can advise you on whether this is a viable option in your case. Overall, the key to resolving a Red Notice issue when immigrating to the US is to be transparent and appoint a qualified advocate to best explain your case and the underlying legal issues and/or the invalidity of the Red Notice against you.

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